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, with businesses, entrepreneurs, state government, all working economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered 4 years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has not dimmed and the recession has not diminished our thirst for innovation and our talent for technological growth. we are the most creative, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of th
it poses to the world. from the standpoint of stability. and peaceful transition of governments. we're reminded of that almost every day. and -- sweeps across the middle of the world starting in indonesia and coming across northern africa and moving down to the sub sahara part of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we have seen that ignoring the threat as we did in afghanistan pre 9/11. t true that the american public is more wary but never the less, we're reminding every day on cnn n and other networks and journalists from "the washington post . >> talk more i want to get that mentioned in there. we're living in different kind of world. it's hard to define where the threat is because it popping up everywhere. it's like wack a mole. you wack one iraq and you think it get it settles and you're back in afghanistan. and we are in the arab spring and libya and algeria and things are happening that pose real threats particularly at the time when the possibility of the combination of weapons of mass destruction and terrorists can result in attack on american presence
have entrusted with the authority of government the spirit of wisdom, that there might be justice and peace in our land. when times are prosperous, let our hearts be thankful. in troubled times, do not let our trust in you fail. in your holy name we pray. amen.>> amen. >> as we join our prayers with those of the people across the nation, so we say, each in our own language, the prayer that jesus taught us. our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. give us this day, our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever and ever. amen.♪ [singing "america the o beautiful for spacious skies ♪ ♪ america, america ♪ ♪ [organ music playing] ♪ ♪ america! america! god shed his grace on thee ♪ >> the lord. bless you and keep you. >> the holy one made god's face to shine upon you. and be gracious unto you. >> the lord, lift up his countenance upon yo
in the case regarding the legality of some of the charges. attempts by the u.s. government to legitimatize these military tribunals have been complicated by the fact that the only two convictions of guantanamo bay prisoners via tribunals have been reversed by civilian appeals courts. the administration is also facing heat over its continued reliance on drone strikes. according to figures compiled by the london-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and
, but they do it. they are. lying somehow acts of government and spending can somehow control our government to the climate we want. he said we could do something about floods and hurricanes and droughts, now the power of the ballot box extends to controlling the weather. neil: do you feel this speaks to urgency of doing something about this, what do you think? >> if you accept the united nations and al gore's view, doing, whatever they propose, would have no impact according to their figures. so it is an exercise in futility even if you believe it. the kyoto protocol. the grand-daddy of all climate treaties, which canada has just pulled out of. if that were fully ratified and enforced, it would not have a impact on global warming according to global warming activists figures, the same with u.s., cap and trade bill, obama saying it would have made our planet 4 to 5 degrees cooler. meanwhile epa was forced to say it would not affect the levels, the idea we could do something does nat bear out, only we forward to through technology, we're watching it with fracking, u.s. is down 2007 levels of
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
as online -- send us a tweet by typing @c spanwj. state and local governments are on their best financial shape since the recession. given leeway to cushion the u.s. economy from federal budget cuts. here are some other stories in the news. this is from "the national council of state legislatures," which runs up what lawmakers are facing as they enter their session throughout the country. it says, -- it also looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is ed
and the government can be prohibitive at times. well we have done is we try to focus our investments on technology. technology makes sense -- may be expensive but if you look at the total cost, it significantly reduces the overall cost. if you have an $80,000 cancer drug regimen that only works in 25% of patients, if we want a $100,000 test to take the 80% that cannot receive benefits, not only do we spare the patient the side effects, we save health care about the cost. the obama administration a few years ago used t o -- to quote data. about $25 billion had no impact on the patient. if we spent $3 billion in these test capabilities, you save health care costs. we are looking at these game changing technologies to improve the overall cost of health care. the beauty of these is it is the essence of personalized medicine. if we can more effectively take your dna and identify the nuances of your specific disease, which cannot practice trial and error madison -- medicine. it is hundreds of billions of dollars wasted on trial and error madison. more specific approaches treating disease at the individu
continuing resolutions to fund the government forever is unsustainable. you need to pass a budget to begin with a foundation. >> mr. cole, i also talked to attorneys, our attorneys, some other attorneys, not just on our staff and i tell them, talk to me like i can understand you. because they talk too much legal lease. i ask them, if i get a paycheck in my account every month and i don't get that paycheck in my account, so whenever it may come, at the end of the year, that's varying. their opinion, that could be. they didn't say it was. they said it could be that could violate the 27th amendment because they're varyingnot coming this month. coming at the end of the year. the other thing i would like to -- don't understand -- and i want to tell you like i think and how it is. we are kind of like trying to not punish but penalize the other side. the senate. because they haven't acted. so what we're doing is drafting legislation that's going to make our side, whether we pass or maybe sometimes not pass a budget, and we're going to punish, not punish. maybe penalize our side by not getting a p
. >> jon: the atf, the bureau, alcohol, tobacco and firearms. it's an actual government agency not just a traditional southern wedding gift. look -- [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] -- i would like -- i would like -- depends on where you are registered really. although when you get those they don't have to be registered. that's the beauty. i would like the atf's director to explain to you if you are out there 24 slrk 7 why is this country ass deep in illegal gun? >> we've not had a director of alcohol tobacco and fire for six years. >> jon: sure. i'm supposed to believe the captain can't have sugary drinks. i don't trust information from anyone who can't handle more than 16 ounces of high fructose ambrosia. >> they haven't a permanent director in six years. >> jon: oh, my god there's no atf director. there's no director of atf is it like a montessori agency where there's no director but agents who just encourage to be curious? and regulate weapons at their own pace? >> the current acting director commutes from minnesota. he is the u.s. attorney from minnesota as well as acting directo
that they almost have to move were also much of their income is going to go to the government. gerri: us take a look at those numbers. his state tax will go to a 13%. that is a state income tax which means he will pay an additional 2 million in taxes. that doesn't even include the federal increase in taxes that we talk so much about the end of last year which would go to a 39 and a half%. this is a fella who has a net worth of 150 million, making money every single year. he will have a very big tax tab. >> absolutely. >> absolutely commit to the point where he is probably going to have to either move to another state income-tax state or have to move to the caribbean or move out of the estates. gerri: what is that? >> essentially, any place where an athlete place, within their jurisdiction they have to file taxes. so across all sports respectively they have to file in the state where they actually play in the game. any type of income that they receive based of their contract they have to file. the government wants their money. gerri: you were mentioning where he might go. take a look at the hi
, entrepreneurs, state government, all working together. now it's 24 years later. i have a new job, a new vantage point, and the world looks much different. a once vibrant and growing state economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered four years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we do remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has not dimmed and the recession has not diminished our thirst for innovation and our talent for technological growth. we are the most creative, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro-wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a world
a border security would be beefed up and the government would improve its tracking of current visa holders. the senators also want to grant more green cards to highly educated immigrants and would allow more lower-skilled workers into the country especially for agricultural purposes. finally, the agreement calls for an effective verification system to crack down on employers who hire workers in the country illegally. in 2006 and 2007, similar efforts to fix the nation's patchwork of immigration laws failed under both republican and democratically controlled congresses but democratic senator chuck sheumer of new york said this time will be different. >> the politics on this issue have been turn upsidedown. for the first time ever there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> election
and the government would improve its tracking of current visa holders. the senators also want to grant more green cards to highly educated immigrants and would allow more lower-skilled workers into the country especially for agricultural purposes. finally the agreement calls for an effective verification system to crack down on employers who hire workers in the country illegally. in 2006 and 2007 similar efforts to fix the nation's patchwork of immigration laws failed under both republican and democratically controlled congresses but democratic senator chuck sheumer of new york said this time will be different. >> the politics on this issue have been turn upsidedown. for the first time ever there's more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing t
rated as one of the worst two-year sessions in the history of the united states government. well, what are we going to do differently? how is it that we only addressed one out of 24 appropriation bills over the last two years? how is it that so many important bills never made it to the floor of the senate, bills such as the replacement for no child left behind, coming on bipartisan vision out of -- out of committee? how is it that so many bills came to this floor to never see a final vote? the disclose act which would have eliminated secrecy in campaign donations. the dream act, which would have honored creating a future for those who know only america as their home. the president's jobs package, which would have helped put america back to work. the closing of loopholes for the biggest, most wealthy oil companies. those funds could be put to use, reducing our deficit or funding critical programs for working americans. on issue after issue after issue, we saw inaction. and what we heard yesterday at the start of this next two years was a call from the president for action. he said in hi
it together as a government, a community, as a state. in 2013, let us honor one another. our renewed community. let us honor those we have lost. we have a great deal of work to do. but if history is any judge, we will rise to the occasion. when called upon, we will answer as we have done time and time again. as one people, one community, and one connecticut. [applause] as we begin our work which will take many months, may god bless each and every one of you. madoff last the great state of connecticut and the united states of america. -- may god bless the creek state of connecticut, and the united states of america. [applause] >> on c-span2 night, house speaker john boehner and house republicans discussed federal spending in the national debt. then the house rules committee. a house ways and means committee and why he thinks the debate should be different -- separate from the talks. house speaker john boehner and other house republicans briefed reporters on a vote on the debt ceiling. the house will vote wednesday on a measure that will occur -- extend the debt limit until may 19. included is a
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
.c. beltway and was pretty adamant the fiscal cliff was not armageddon and our government is becoming less dysfunctional. you got get the worries in the rear view mirror and people look what is going well. housing recovery is real. auto situation is strong. david: let me hold you on housing for a second, jeff. we had a pullback on prices. we had a tremendous run-up in 2012 in the price of housing. were you worried at all on the prices today? >> not really because if you drill down into the numbers, beneath the surface numbers are really not all that bad. i'm here in real estate central in st. petersburg, clear water, tampa, the housing recovery is real. you're seeing spec homes built and they're trading hands. sandra: get to your individual picks. there are certain stocks you like. you tend to favor the cyclical sectors. i'm seeing names like hewlett-packard, intel, mosaic, general motors to. tell us about your picks. >> those are the last four we put on. we're basically set up with cyclical companies that range from things like general motors, hewlett-packard, intel and technology, techno
government and the libyan government. i saw firsthand what is called, timely and exceptional coordination. no delays in decision making. no denials of support from washington or our military. i want to echo the review board praise for the valor and courage of the people on the ground, especially the security professionals in benghazi and tripoli. american lives were saved in real time. the next morning, i told the american people that heavily armed militants -- i stood with president obama as he spoke about an act of terror. it is important to recall in that same time period, we were seeing violent attacks in cairo, as well as large protests outside many other posts, where thousands of our diplomats served. so i immediately ordered a review of our security posture around the world, with particular scrutiny for high- threat posts. and i asked the department of defense to join interagency security assessment teams and to dispatch hundreds of additional marine security guards. i named the first deputy assistant secretary of state for high threat posts so that missions in dangerous places get
that the government should not be entangled in this. in other words, taxpayer money should not be going for the provision of abortion. that's one bit of good news. the second bit of good news is, i think, again, those of us who have been here a little while, who have been in these trenches trying to beg and plead for an increase of awareness as to what the consequences of abortion are, young people are recognizing that, again, there's got to be a better way. they've lived with this through their generation. they've seen the scars, seen the wounds, seen the effects on society and they're coming forward and saying women deserve better. can't we be loving enough, can't we be big enough to do something different here? and i think that's a great sign of encouragement for two reasons. one is projecting forward, maybe we can reshape society. but also heal the wounds that have already occurred. because they are substantive indeed. and i think it's important, and young people, i believe, recognize this. they're there saying, don't make this choice. it's a false choice. particularly if you feel c
orders. putting pressure on our state governments because there are areas, for example, fracking that are unregulated. deforestation. i think when we concentrate on just the congress national level we get frustrated and we get to the point where we say nothing is going to be done. if we look at cobbling together the different approaches, i think we can move forward. >> this idea that was brought up about the tragedies that lead us to say we must do something then the idea of using executive orders and cobbling things together. i wonder, part of what gave me a gut reaction to the oh now that hurricane sandy happened is whoa, these injustices have been so real for communities without resources, without power and often communities of color for so long. it feels a little bit like these lives and bodies matter and these other ones don't. >> exactly. what we see is that we see the climate impacts right now. we know that in alaska native americans are being relocated away from receding shorelines. we have seen what's happened in terms of civil disruption in new orleans. now we have sand
government. and because we serve the great people of indiana. [applause] if we will remain bold, confident, and optimistic, i am positive that we can lead our state from good to great. hoosiers believed that of gratitude to all gathered in this room. our state has become the fiscal envy of the nation. a model for how the government works. we balanced budgets and we have surpluses. most states are broke and struggling. one of only nine states with a aaa bond rating. higher than the federal government. while we rightly celebrate our progress, it is important to note that these are still difficult times for many in our state. as we gather this evening, a quarter of a million hoosiers are out of work. nearly 1 million black the basic skills they need to succeed in today's marketplace. too many of our schools are still lagging behind. some way behind. especially heartbreaking to this father. one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and businesses struggling to get by, we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better,
a perfect calculation to that. the problem with the afghan government and people is they lack certainty, they look confidence. they're terrified by 2014, not because there's been no progress, but because they're afraid they'll lose that progress. in 199, they turned their back on the region. i think what they need to see from america is enough engagement to show that we are not going to abandon them. >> i went to ask president karzai. i wantmen business here to be making a profit, because if you were here and making a profit, then you'll have a stake in our security. i think that's one kind of indicator. i think it l probably be necessary us -- it's time for them to protect their sovereignty for the most part and so we have got to figure out how best to do that. >> joe hadden a number? >> i have said 10,000 to 15,000 and let me give you a sense of what that comprises. >> number one training. no one can prothen finally, our we have got a sufficient to print and basic structure to do that. >> but this is correct. just the way it laid out here, everyone else in the neighborhood is looking,
of government to regulate guns, but they also put a definite boundary on how far those can go. so an outright ban on handguns like we had in chicago before, like washington, d.c. had, that goes too far. whether the second amendment right goes as far as to extend the right of self-defense that the supreme court found that you have in the home to when you leave the home is another question spirally. entirely. and i think, ultimately, probably the what happens in congress is not going to be greatly affected, is not going to be greatly constrained by what the supreme court is going to allow. i think the court on things like regulation of particular types of guns, waiting periods, background checks and things like that is, will probably be willing to -- we'll probably be willing to allow that sort of thing. >> i wallet you all to know that -- i want you all to know that i've opinion sending mash notes to my wife who's away. [laughter] i know this is a big appointment for you every day, you may not see nightly news tonight, but chuck todd actually had a report on what the president's going to recom
with the libyan government. they had a willingness to protect our people but not a capacity. if you knew there was no capacity, i saw that video from that night. i have to tell you, the libyans that we had charged, we outsourced our security to, they ran as soon as they saw those attackers come to the consulate gate. and so we knew they didn't have that capacity. i think as the person who is in charge, the accountability review board found that there were systemic failures of leadership, that this is a very important issue. >> i've been listening to the republicans getting on their high horse about this for a long time. i thought a lot of today's criticism was political grandstanding in many ways. if you go back to catastrophic intelligence failures before 9/11 or in the build to the iraq war more serious than this. that's not to diminish the deaths of four americans but those led to the deaths of many, many, many more americans. you got to say get this in perspective. hillary clinton to me seemed to me today to be sincere. i don't think anyone can expect the secretary of state to read e
government workers like teachers, firefighters, public administrators. time now for lou dobbs. >> one hates to lose the public administrators and one wonders how the nation will be administered without them. it is an interesting story. it is counter to conventional views and expectations of most people. we have been watching the battles at the national labor relations board. we know that the president has stacked it with his allies and em baa stairs to the marketplace, and there is this expectation that the powerful organization fl-cio, the service employees union, the teachers unions are just growing and growing, which they had been until last year. we started to see the impact of those local cuts in budgets. this government, this administration, pumped, as you recall in the stimulus package, hundreds of billions of dollars into the hiring of what had been traditionally union jobs, teachers, police, you name it. that's over. what we are seeing now is the market place begins to work. now, as we look at how dramatic these reductions are, basically 6.5% membership in the private sector tells
, but they have been working off a continuing resolution which funds the government for certain amount of time. it will end on march 27. house leaders tried to put forward or sketched out a game plan for how they would handle things going forward. the first step in all this is the vote today on a short-term debt limit extension. host: seth, you mentioned the republican retreat last week and on conversations with conservatives, an event on capitol hill yesterday. what kind of dissent did you hear from conservative republicans on the debt ceiling vote? guest: they want to make sure that they get some sort of deficit reduction out of this. i think it makes them a little nervous. this is what many will referred to as a clean vote on the debt ceiling, if they're not a lot of strings attached. they would like to see more deficit reduction. i think they are a little weary that leadership will follow through on their promises. so it is within that vein. i guess i would say that conservative lawmakers, at least the most conservative, wants to be cautiously optimistic that house leaders might follow thr
was that for $1 spent on the younger generations, my generation gets $4 from the federal government. well, there's a moral issue here about what kind of country we're leaving for the future and what we're turning over to our children. and so i think it's worthwhile to at least acknowledge that those of us who raise these kind of questions not be labeled or targeted as trying to throw people on the street or not respond to legitimate needs, but we're simply trying to say we need some standards here to apply to a situation where our spending is out of control. now every business in america has to do this and has had to do this this past four or five years in order to survive. families have had to do this in order to make sure they can make the mortgage payment, or dad has lost his job. there's been enforced discipline on the basis of an economy that has been stagnant for about four years. in the meantime the federal government keeps plunging into debt. so if someone brings forward an alternative to at least give us the opportunity to provide effective oversight and to make sure that this money doe
relative to how successful the government in afghanistan can be without significant american presence. it is difficult enough in iraq, pretty much inside the perimeter and along of factions fighting in afghanistan. looks to me about the tenfold magnitude of what could potentially happen with the u.s. reduction in presence. i have always said afghanistan is not just about afghanistan. it is also about pakistan. the picture being painted here is a significantly less presence of u.s. involvement in that region with all the consequences that can come from that. >> we are going to try to bring it around here. i should have said when you do enter your question, ask for the microphone and stand and identify yourself and keep your question short. if we have time we will get back to you. >> please identify yourself. >> one of the things -- jack james from the american institute of german studies. i want to ask about europe and whether or not you think there's enough support coming from europe to deal with those issues. we just talked about it. germany as you well know, and britain, have been g
is going to govern in his second term, those lines provide a really important clue. he was strong and he made this really important point; that he will not abandon the poor or the vulnerable or the marginalized. president obama said that social security and medicaid and medicare do not make us weak as a nation do not make us a nation of takers. those things they make us stronger as a nation. the president and we he said we cannot rest until all americans, all children, all people know matter their circumstances, all of us give meaning to that declaration of independence that we are all created equal. that's what this speech was all about. it was about us. we the people who can determine the destiny of this country, rich and poor, black and white, gay and straight every single one of us. powerful, and empowering. joining us from washington to discuss which issues and the theme of today's inauguration by president obama is bill press, host of "full court press," author of machine: the lies, distortions and personal attacks on the president and who's behind them," and
engagement in parts of the world that are struggling to build new governments from what often has been a chaotic situation and underscore the very real courage of the unsung men and women who put their lives at risk to serve this nation's interest in those areas. let me say i respect what you have done during your tenure as second s. secretary of state in representing not only this nation but all of those in our foreign service who are on the diplomatic front line in turbulent and dangerous parts of the globe. it's a reflection of your leadership as well as your patriotism and your abiding belief in the power of our policies to move the world towards democracy, peace and the preservation of human rights. your candor before this committee has been a trademark of your service as secretary of state. i believe every member always welcomed your openness and your cooperation. your letter of de18th to chairman kerry was appreciated by members of both sides as another example of that openness and cooperation. let me say we share your mission here today and that we look forward to a constructiv
people, and they can't pass the senate. for the regular business, for the regular business of government, for the regular business of passing senate bipartisan legislation, the tea party hastert rule combination is deadly. so back to where i began. if you're concerned about dysfunction in congress, if you're wondering why we're less popular than a root canal, if you're wondering why 77% of americans look at congress and think that we're actually doing more harm than good, if update an explaining -- if you want an explanation of the dysfunction, take a look at the hastert rule. if you look at this problem the way a doctor would look at a patient, the way an engineer would look at a system, the way a car mechanic would look at an automobile, and you look for what is broken, be specific, it is the application by the speaker of the hastert rule that prevents bipartisan, ropg strong senate legislation from going forward. when something moves, it's because the hastert rule has been waived. so if you want to see what's wrong, that quest takes you straight to the house of representatives, and th
, bloated government, and now medicare is saying, oh, we don't know how to recuperate the funds. we don't have the tools or database, so it's just frustrating and disappointing to see the government throw away our money. >> there was a story about a year or so ago where the irs was sending checks to inmates that didn't deserve checks as well. >> exactly. what this shows is that washington isn't really serious about fixing our debt issue. because medicare is one of the biggest driving forces of our long-term national debt. if they were serious they would try to eliminate this waste and fraud, and what is frustrating is for young people like me, who we pay into the system, we're funding it, and the money isn't being saved for us. it's being spent right now. so not only are we paying for a program that is unsustainable, but the government is spending our money and giving it to people who don't deserve it. >> $120 million, people are saying, what's 120 million when the government spends $2.3 trillion. you have to start somewhere. >> exactly. all these things add up. a little waste in this d
against the most defenseless. the question is does government have the obligation to protect those children? i believe we do. i believe we do. >> a quick question on this. i want to ask on a couple other subjects. could you see your way clear to a school security program or to saying listen, i think there maybe be arm guards at some of the schools? >> of course. one-third of the schools in america today have school guards. there were two at columbine. they couldn't get to the shooter. and that is the problem with this thing. having school guards really isn't the whole answer. the more you have these weapons, these military style weapons that with the single stock of the ar-15 can be made fully automatic, the minute you have it in the sandy hook killer's hands, have youyou have a devas weapon. >> it is now bubbling up. i'm surprised the speaker of the house, president of the united states, we're very close to an immigration bill. give me a sense of where the senate is on that? where congress is on the immigration bill? >> my understanding from senator schumer, we will have a stateme
place to see often thanks to the u.s. government. one man says his home is in disrepair. his name is steve chat ty, a roofer. he says he and his three other family members are living in a rented basement and for the time being, that's the best they can do, and they are grateful for that. when they talk about tent city, they say without it they couldn't have survived. here's what he said. >> this place is basically the best thing that ever happened to us after the storm. they been here since day one. they help everybody in the community, from food, drinks, down to diapers, and you name it. people relied on this place after the hurricane. >> now there is concern this snowstorm expected to arrive in a few hours could be difficult to cope with, especially here with these very fragile tents, and late not forget, winter continues for many more months. >> shepard: yes, it does, david lee, thanks for the work. look at this video crews in northeast massachusetts. icicles forming on their go. they have to watch where they step because water turns to ice quickly. here's how the arctic air sw
in and the government could compensate you for it and after an extended period of time it was illegal to own these. the problem with america you couldn't do that. there are 300 million guns in circulation. and i don't think any american under the right to bear arms amendment in the constitution, any conif you confiscation. in california they got 2,000 handed in, in one day. it was a start. people were handing in rocket launchers, charlie, in los angeles. you know, i look at britain. i look at australia. i looked at the reaction that happened to those massacres there, and it was very different to here. it wasn't awe political issue. it wasn't 11 and right. the australian prime minister, john howard, wrote in the "new york times," fascinating piece about -- >> rose: what he did. >> he was considered pretty far right conservative, but he brought in really draconian gun control, and as he pointed out,ain massacres per the port arthur massacre which was a tipping point in the previous 10 or 12 years, i think it was. and since 1996 not a single one. and in britain a very similar story. >> rose: does bri
time ever house republicans unveiling the bill to let the government continue borrowing through may 18th. it doesn't have specific debt limits but to increase it. the current limit $15.4 trillion. did nonunion lead to vandals cut bolts and set it on fire. there's a reward for information leading to an arrest. >>> winter's wrath has certainly arrived in a lot of the country. coldest air in two years has hit new york and created more misery from the victims of super storm sandy. many are working to restore heat in their home. wnyw reporter is live for us with more. three months after the storm some people still without heat. >> still without heat shth hot wa, hot water. many of the electricity is spotty. it is extremely windy and icy out here. it will only get colder in the coming days. they loov an estimate on how many new yorkers are without heat and hot water since super storm sandy. but they certainly exist. we went to the ocean village complex in rockaway queens new york where they still don't have heat and hot water and the generator shut down for 6 hours on monday. these are the t
that that is what causes that contributes to the federal government continuing to spend money it does not have, the mortgaging our children's future. thanks to the house of representatives for bringing this to the country's attention and we look forward to taking up the budget here and having a vigorous debate of america's future. >> the words of spending and that probably were not included in that speech and we happen to believe the biggest threat is runaway government spending. that we are piling on the backs of future generations of americans. since april 2009, we hope that the president will focus on what is important in this country important to the american people. those are the types of things that we are anxious to work with this president on. but what we have heard very little of in his speech yesterday. on election night, the president spoke and he said that we want our children to go up and world where they are not burdened by debt. that was election night. the president said spending is not a problem. and they said set in the absence of an agreed and credible deficit reduction plan
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